Monday, April 24, 2017

Water Protector Red Fawn Seeks Recusal of Judge in Federal Case




WATER PROTECTOR RED FAWN FALLIS SEEKS RECUSAL OF JUDGE IN FEDERAL CASE 
Water Protectors' Rights to Due Process Violated by Judicial Bias
By Water Protector Legal Collective
Censored News
April 24, 2017
BISMARCK, NORTH DAKOTA: Lakota Water Protector Red Fawn Fallis through her attorney Bruce Ellison has filed a Motion for an Order of Recusal requesting that Federal Judge Daniel Hovland disqualify himself from further proceedings in her case due to his apparent bias against Water Protectors.
Ms. Fallis is facing three federal felony charges in relation to allegations stemming from her involvement in the No Dakota Access Pipeline (NoDAPL) movement. Her Motion for Recusal is based on Judge Hovland’s admitted reliance upon out-of-court evidence--such as television and news reports, as well as his own personal observations--in deciding facts related to cases involving NoDAPL Water Protectors. In one instance, Judge Hovland wrote in a court order on September 16, 2016:
With respect to the assertion the movement has been a peaceful protest, one need only turn on a television set or read any newspaper in North Dakota. There the viewer will find countless videos and photographs of ‘peaceful’ protesters…verbally taunting, harassing, and showing disrespect to members of the law enforcement community.
The Motion for Recusal is also based on bias demonstrated specifically toward Ms. Fallis by Judge Hovland's decision to violate court rules by reversing within 24 hours an order issued by Magistrate Charles Miller releasing Ms. Fallis to a halfway house prior to her trial. In doing so, Judge Hovland did not give Ms. Fallis the opportunity to respond to the government’s motion to revoke the Magistrate’s order, in violation of Local Rule 47.1 of the North Dakota District Court.
Ms. Fallis, in an affidavit accompanying the motion for recusal, wrote:
I am aware of the serious criminal charges I face which have lengthy potential criminal sentences. I am therefore very concerned and believe that I deserve to receive a fair trial by a fair jury and have my trial held before an impartial judge….
 It…seems to me that Judge Hovland has pre-decided opinions on all aspects of my case and that he will not consider my case individually based upon evidence presented in court in my case. Judge Hovland continually sides with the government in deciding what are the facts, relies on TV, some of his own out of court observations, and things not based on evidence in court to make decisions. Based on the things he has said and written, Judge Hovland has a personal bias or certainly appears to be biased in favor of the government and against me to the point that I believe I cannot receive a fair trial in front of him, and that he does not believe there is any truth to what the different Water Protectors in his court have to say.
WPLC considers the evidence of the judge's bias against Ms. Fallis and other Water Protectors to be yet another piece of the broader effort to undermine the right to a fair trial guaranteed to all Water Protectors, and to unfairly target indigenous individuals involved in the indigenous-led NoDAPL movement.
Bruce Ellison, attorney for Red Fawn Fallis, said, “the documents we filed in Court on Thursday and Judge Hovland’s own statements and rulings show that the lack of due process given to Red Fawn Fallis by this Court is consistent with what seems to be the unquestioned acceptance of all facts alleged by the government, the Dakota Access corporation, and local media. The role of the judge is to be fair and impartial, and to independently decide the case in spite of media and government portrayals of events related to the conduct of Red Fawn and other Water Protectors on the day of her arrest. The statements made on the record and the rulings by Judge Hovland clearly create, at least, the appearance of partiality.”
Water Protectors who have seen and experienced bias and discrimination by public officials based on their indigeneity or political associations are encouraged to contact the Water Protector Legal Collective for advice and representation.
The Water Protector Legal Collective (WPLC) provides on-the-ground legal representation and coordination for Water Protectors engaged in resistance to the Dakota Access Pipeline at Standing Rock, ND in partnership with the National Lawyers Guild (NLG). To support the work of WPLC, please visit https://fundrazr.com/RedOwlLegal
www.WaterProtectorLegal.org
Contact: Bruce Ellison, Attorney for Red Fawn Fallis and WPLC Board Member, belli4law@aol.com,
Sandra Freeman, Director, WPLC Criminal Defense Office, sandra.c.freeman@gmail.com
Jessica Beheler, WPLC Media Coordinator, pr@wplegal.org


Indigenous Women: Voices of Global Resistance in New York and DC

.

Dear Friends and Allies,

This week - please be welcome to join the Women's Earth and Climate Action Network at the People's Climate March for Jobs, Justice and Climate - and for two upcoming events - 'Indigenous Women Protecting Earth, Rights and Communities - New York Cityon April 26th and 'Women Leading Solutions on the Frontlines of Climate Change - D.C.' on April 29th, after the People's Climate March!
Indigenous Women Protecting Earth, Rights 
and Communities - New York City
When - April 26th, 2017 from 1:00-4:00 pm
Where - United Nations Church Center - 777 United Nations Plaza #8g, New York City, NY


Featuring - 

  • Casey Camp Horinek (Ponca; Ponca Nation Council Woman, WECAN Advisory Council Member, USA)

  • Lucy Mulenkei (Maasai; Executive Director of the Indigenous Information Network, Kenya)
  • Kandi Mossett (Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara; Lead Organizer on the Extreme Energy & Just Transition Campaign with the Indigenous Environmental Network, USA)
  • Gloria Ushigua* (Sápara; President of the Association of Sapara Women, Ecuador) - to be confirmed
  • Betty Lyons (Onondaga; President and Executive Director of the American Indian Law Alliance, USA)
  • Michelle Cook (Diné; human rights lawyer and founding member of the of the Water Protector Legal Collective at Standing Rock, USA)
  • Heather Milton Lightening (Pasqua First Nation, Cree, Anishinabe, Blackfoot and Dakota; Indigenous Tar Sands Campaigner with Polaris Institute, Canada)
  • Alina Saba (Limbu; Nepal Policy Center, Nepal)
About the Event - Indigenous women around the world are impacted first and worst by the effects of environmental destruction and a rapidly changing climate - these disproportionate impacts the result of a dangerous intersection of colonialism, racism, extractive economies and patriarchy. However despite all odds and against great challenges, it is these very same Indigenous women who are rising up, challenging the status quo, holding a vision, and taking action to build the vital solutions needed for a just and livable future for everyone. 

Join frontline Indigenous women leaders from countries around the world and the Women's Earth and Climate Action Network, as we gather to share stories, concerns, struggles and plans of action for change. Included in the event discussion will be resistance efforts from Standing Rock to the Amazon; Indigenous rights and frontline communities; the tenth anniversary of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples; and women's leadership and calls for action within a climate justice framework. 

This public event will be held in parallel to the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues happening in New York at this time, with the expressed purpose of ensuring that the vital voices of Indigenous women leaders are heard by the public, media and government representatives during the formal UN processes. We are thrilled to be presenting this event with the collaboration of MADRE and ClimateMama.
Women Leading Solutions on the 
Frontlines of Climate Change - D.C.

When - April 29th, 2017 from 6:00-8:30 pm, after the People's Climate March
Where - Impact Hub D.C. - 419 7th St NW, Washington, DC 20004
Featuring - 
  • Angela Adrar (Executive Director, Climate Justice Alliance)
  • Tara Houska (Anishinaabe Peoples; Tribal attorney, National Campaigns Director of Honor the Earth, and former advisor on Native American affairs to Bernie Sanders)
  • May Boeve (Executive Director, 350. org)
  • Alina Saba (Limbu Peoples, Nepal Policy Center, Nepal)
  • Rhonda Hamilton (Ward 6 Advisory Neighborhood Commissioner and Buzzard Point Community Leader)
  • Pennie Opal Plant (Indigenous Leader, Founding Member, Idle No More SF Bay, Movement Rights)
  • Leila Salazar Lopez (Executive Director, Amazon Watch)
  • Sally Coxe (President & Co-Founder, Bonobo Conservation Initiative)
  • Cherri Foytlin (Indigenous Leader, State Director, Bold Louisiana)
  • Victoria Barrett (Youth Plantiff, Our Children's Trust)
  • Osprey Orielle Lake (Executive Director, Women's Earth & Climate Action Network)
About the Event - Join the Women's Earth and Climate Action Network for 'Women Leading Solutions on the Frontlines of Climate Change - D.C.', a dynamic gathering with worldwide women leaders joined in solidarity to speak out against environmental and social injustice, draw attention to root causes of the climate crisis, and present the diverse array of visions and strategies with which they are working to shape a healthy and equitable world. 

This event is organized with the conviction that real forward movement towards climate justice depends on the full and equal participation of women in all stages of decision making and implementation, and that real change will come from women mobilizing and taking action at the local, national, and international level. Women have always been on the frontlines, now it is time for them to be at the forefront. 

Included in topic discussions will be resistance efforts from Standing Rock to the Amazon; Indigenous rights, environmental racism, and frontline communities; the intersection of gender and environment; and women's leadership and calls for action within a climate justice framework. We are thrilled to be presenting this event with the partnership of Impact Hub D.C.
March with #Women4ClimateJustice 
at the People's Climate March
On April 29 - the Women's Earth and Climate Action Network will join a diverse coalition of women's groups, climate justice organization and allies, organizing together to march as a Women for Climate Justice Contingent at the Peoples Climate March for Jobs, Justice and the Climate in Washington D.C., and in support of local marches across the country and world.

In Washington D.C. - the contingent will march as part of the second block 'Creators of Sanctuary' - meeting for the start of the march at 4th St NW and Constitution Ave NW. Please join us and follow the Facebook Events Page for all meet-up updates.

Allies marching locally are encouraged to use the resources below to connect with each other and prepare for Sister Marches.

Key Links:
For the Earth and All Generations, 

Osprey Orielle Lake
Co-Founder and Executive Director
Women's Earth and Climate Action Network 
STAY CONNECTED:
Like us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter
Visit our blog
WECAN International, 20 Sunnyside Avenue, #A-438, Mill Valley, CA 94941
Sent by osprey@wecaninternational.org in collaboration with
Constant Contact

Women for Climate Justice Unite: People's Climate March April 29, 2017




Women for Climate Justice To Unite In Action At The People's Climate March


By WECAN International
Censored News

WASHINGTON, D.C. (April 24, 2017) -  On April 29, 2017, a diverse coalition of women's groups, climate justice organization and allies will unite to march as a Women for Climate Justice Contingent at the People's Climate March for Jobs, Justice and the Climate in Washington D.C., and in support of local marches happening across the country.

The March comes as the culmination of strong actions organized by the climate justice, immigrant and refugee rights, Indigenous sovereignty, Black Lives Matter and other intersectional movements over the first 100 days of the Trump Administration presidency.

The Women for Climate Justice Contingent will speak out and take action at the 2017 People's Climate March to give voice to women's disproportionate vulnerability to the impacts of climate change, while also showing the diversity, strength and solutions of global women leaders.

The Contingent aims to send a clear message to the U.S. Administration and world governments that, as women, many of whom stand on the frontlines of climate change, we are gravely concerned about the impacts of climate change, and the implications of a U.S. Administration that promotes climate skepticism, advancement of fossil fuels, an extractive economy, environmental racism, bigotry and inequitable treatment of women and girls.

The Contingent is organizing in a decentralized manner via social media. Press and media are invited to engage with spokeswomen in advance of the march to understand why women are key to climate justice and solutions; and also encouraged to contact organizers of the Women for Climate Justice Contingent to engage on the ground and accompany the Women for Climate Justice Contingent during the People's Climate March in Washington D.C.

"As women, we understand the responsibility of ensuring the health of Mother Earth, the waters and the sacred system of life.  When we stand together our authority and power is magnified and nothing will stop us from ensuring a vibrantly healthy future for generations to come.  This is our responsibility and what we were born to do this at this time. " explained Pennie Opal Plant, Founding Member, Idle No More SF Bay

"When we refer to a just transition away from fossil fuels, we must challenge new industries to also transition away from prevailing power structures and a sexually disaggregated labor force...We  also must continue to grapple with the broader implications of transitioning to low-carbon economies in a just way, including in regards to re-thinking the current sexual division of labor, promoting decent work for women in under-valued fields such as care work; the (social) service sector; sustainable, locally focused agriculture and fisheries; as well as locally governed renewable energies with women participating equally as shareholders, owners, and fairly remunerated workers. We must also tackle issues of land rights, inheritance, and access to credit." explained Bridget Burns, Co-Director, Women's Environment and Development Organization (WEDO)

"The 2017 People's Climate March is an urgent moment to demonstrate the collective resistance, action power and solutions of the climate justice movement. Women for Climate Justice will be marching in D.C. and across the country to make clear that we refuse to continue to allow the health and survival of our communities and the Earth's living systems to be sacrificed for profit. We are raising our voices in the streets, the forests, the fields, the courtrooms and the halls of government to demonstrate that a just and livable future is possible, and that women will be ceaseless in our work to protect and defend the Earth and the global climate. Despite experiencing the impacts of climate change with disproportionate severity, women are rising everyday to build the solutions we need. From divestment campaigns, renewable energy projects, agro-ecology practices, fossil fuel resistance to defending women's, Indigenous and Earth rights, women are leading the way ," explained Osprey Orielle Lake, Executive Director, Women's Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN) International

"While the burdens of climate change reach women first and worst, women are more than victims, they're leaders. I am glad to be marching with women who face real climate impacts. We marched on day one and we are marching on day 100, as women, as climate activists, as people who care about our planet's future."  explained A.Tianna Scozzaro, Director, Gender, Equity and Environment, Sierra Club

"We need a Just Transition, from fossil fuels to renewable energy, by which the inequalities that exist in the traditional energy sector are left behind. A just transition that challenges new industries to also move away from prevailing power structures, one that is decentralized, gender-responsive and respectful of human rights,"  explained Daniela Pedraza, Gender, Jobs & Justice Fellow, Women's Environment and Development Organization (WEDO)

"Women are not only on the frontlines of the climate crisis, we are essential to the solutions. I want my daughter to inherit a world where a healthy environment is a basic human right for everyone-no matter where they live, what they look like or how much money they make. Together, we can stand up to a government that is putting polluters first and our children's future risk."explained Rhea Suh, President, Natural Resources Defense Council

"This march is a show of strength and commitment to all peoples and the planet. The threats we face are mighty - from climate deniers that wreck environmental protections to corporate powers that pollute and exploit - but together, we are mightier. We stand together with women in frontline communities around the world who face the worst impacts of climate change and who take action daily to build more resilient communities and to save lives. What's more, these grassroots women possess the solutions that will guide us to a sustainable way of living," explained Yifat Susskind, Executive Director, MADRE

Women and allies from Kentucky to Alaska and across the world are marching for climate justice today. From struggles against police violence to the struggle for water, women are drawing liberation from our roots and lifting it up beyond the moment so that those most impacted by dysfunctional Administrations are protected and whole communities and the planet can thrive. We will build this bridge of resistance to May Day and beyond: rooted in our communities, as hubs of  resistance and transformation until there is climate justice for all.  explained Angela Adrar, Executive Director, Climate Justice Alliance

"As women, we know all too well that the powerful often seek to silence our voices when we speak out to protect the most vulnerable in our communities. We are here today to show that we refuse to be silenced. All around the world, in city halls, corporate boardrooms and on the streets of our cities women are demanding action to protect the planet from the threat of climate change." explained Anne Hidalgo, Mayor of Paris and Chair of C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group

Media Contact:

Emily Arasim, Women's Earth and Climate Action Network
+1 (505) 920-0153

Juliana Vélez Uribe, Women's Environment and Development Organization

Indigenous Women: Voices of Global Resistance in New York and DC



Dear Friends and Allies,

This week - please be welcome to join the Women's Earth and Climate Action Network at the People's Climate March for Jobs, Justice and Climate - and for two upcoming events - 'Indigenous Women Protecting Earth, Rights and Communities - New York Cityon April 26th and 'Women Leading Solutions on the Frontlines of Climate Change - D.C.' on April 29th, after the People's Climate March!
Indigenous Women Protecting Earth, Rights 
and Communities - New York City
When - April 26th, 2017 from 1:00-4:00 pm
Where - United Nations Church Center - 777 United Nations Plaza #8g, New York City, NY


Featuring - 

  • Casey Camp Horinek (Ponca; Ponca Nation Council Woman, WECAN Advisory Council Member, USA)

  • Lucy Mulenkei (Maasai; Executive Director of the Indigenous Information Network, Kenya)
  • Kandi Mossett (Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara; Lead Organizer on the Extreme Energy & Just Transition Campaign with the Indigenous Environmental Network, USA)
  • Gloria Ushigua* (Sápara; President of the Association of Sapara Women, Ecuador) - to be confirmed
  • Betty Lyons (Onondaga; President and Executive Director of the American Indian Law Alliance, USA)
  • Michelle Cook (Diné; human rights lawyer and founding member of the of the Water Protector Legal Collective at Standing Rock, USA)
  • Heather Milton Lightening (Pasqua First Nation, Cree, Anishinabe, Blackfoot and Dakota; Indigenous Tar Sands Campaigner with Polaris Institute, Canada)
  • Alina Saba (Limbu; Nepal Policy Center, Nepal)
About the Event - Indigenous women around the world are impacted first and worst by the effects of environmental destruction and a rapidly changing climate - these disproportionate impacts the result of a dangerous intersection of colonialism, racism, extractive economies and patriarchy. However despite all odds and against great challenges, it is these very same Indigenous women who are rising up, challenging the status quo, holding a vision, and taking action to build the vital solutions needed for a just and livable future for everyone. 

Join frontline Indigenous women leaders from countries around the world and the Women's Earth and Climate Action Network, as we gather to share stories, concerns, struggles and plans of action for change. Included in the event discussion will be resistance efforts from Standing Rock to the Amazon; Indigenous rights and frontline communities; the tenth anniversary of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples; and women's leadership and calls for action within a climate justice framework. 

This public event will be held in parallel to the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues happening in New York at this time, with the expressed purpose of ensuring that the vital voices of Indigenous women leaders are heard by the public, media and government representatives during the formal UN processes. We are thrilled to be presenting this event with the collaboration of MADRE and ClimateMama.
Women Leading Solutions on the 
Frontlines of Climate Change - D.C.

When - April 29th, 2017 from 6:00-8:30 pm, after the People's Climate March
Where - Impact Hub D.C. - 419 7th St NW, Washington, DC 20004
Featuring - 
  • Angela Adrar (Executive Director, Climate Justice Alliance)
  • Tara Houska (Anishinaabe Peoples; Tribal attorney, National Campaigns Director of Honor the Earth, and former advisor on Native American affairs to Bernie Sanders)
  • May Boeve (Executive Director, 350. org)
  • Alina Saba (Limbu Peoples, Nepal Policy Center, Nepal)
  • Rhonda Hamilton (Ward 6 Advisory Neighborhood Commissioner and Buzzard Point Community Leader)
  • Pennie Opal Plant (Indigenous Leader, Founding Member, Idle No More SF Bay, Movement Rights)
  • Leila Salazar Lopez (Executive Director, Amazon Watch)
  • Sally Coxe (President & Co-Founder, Bonobo Conservation Initiative)
  • Cherri Foytlin (Indigenous Leader, State Director, Bold Louisiana)
  • Victoria Barrett (Youth Plantiff, Our Children's Trust)
  • Osprey Orielle Lake (Executive Director, Women's Earth & Climate Action Network)
About the Event - Join the Women's Earth and Climate Action Network for 'Women Leading Solutions on the Frontlines of Climate Change - D.C.', a dynamic gathering with worldwide women leaders joined in solidarity to speak out against environmental and social injustice, draw attention to root causes of the climate crisis, and present the diverse array of visions and strategies with which they are working to shape a healthy and equitable world. 

This event is organized with the conviction that real forward movement towards climate justice depends on the full and equal participation of women in all stages of decision making and implementation, and that real change will come from women mobilizing and taking action at the local, national, and international level. Women have always been on the frontlines, now it is time for them to be at the forefront. 

Included in topic discussions will be resistance efforts from Standing Rock to the Amazon; Indigenous rights, environmental racism, and frontline communities; the intersection of gender and environment; and women's leadership and calls for action within a climate justice framework. We are thrilled to be presenting this event with the partnership of Impact Hub D.C.
March with #Women4ClimateJustice 
at the People's Climate March
On April 29 - the Women's Earth and Climate Action Network will join a diverse coalition of women's groups, climate justice organization and allies, organizing together to march as a Women for Climate Justice Contingent at the Peoples Climate March for Jobs, Justice and the Climate in Washington D.C., and in support of local marches across the country and world.

In Washington D.C. - the contingent will march as part of the second block 'Creators of Sanctuary' - meeting for the start of the march at 4th St NW and Constitution Ave NW. Please join us and follow the Facebook Events Page for all meet-up updates.

Allies marching locally are encouraged to use the resources below to connect with each other and prepare for Sister Marches.

Key Links:
For the Earth and All Generations, 

Osprey Orielle Lake
Co-Founder and Executive Director
Women's Earth and Climate Action Network 
STAY CONNECTED:
Like us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter
Visit our blog
WECAN International, 20 Sunnyside Avenue, #A-438, Mill Valley, CA 94941
Sent by osprey@wecaninternational.org in collaboration with
Constant Contact

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